GROWING VEGETABLES, BERRIES & FRUIT TREES IN NORTH FLORIDA

       
 

FRONT-YARD FARMER HOME PAGE


NICEVILLE.COM HOME PAGE


 

Insect control for Florida vegetable gardens

Here's some advice and a list of insects commonly found in Florida home gardens, and pesticides to control them, from the University of Florida IFAS Extension. Please note that this article was last updated in 2003. In 2004, the residential use of diazinon was prohibited in the U.S.

 

Insect Control

Scout the garden twice weekly for insect damage. Spray only affected plants. Follow label directions. The materials on Table 2 are effective against the insects as indicated.

Soil-inhabiting insects, including mole crickets, wireworms, cutworms, ants, etc., can be controlled with a broadcast pre-plant application of diazinon. Baits containing Dylox or diazinon are effective for cutworms and mole crickets. Use metaldehyde for slug control.

 

Pesticide Precautions
Consider all pesticides as potential poisons. They should be applied strictly according to manufacturers' precautions and recommendations. Always wash vegetables from garden thoroughly before using. Use pesticides only as necessary to control insects and diseases and stop applications during the harvesting season. Apply in early evening to avoid killing bees and reducing pollination. Store pesticides in their original labeled containers. Keep them out of the reach of children and other irresponsible persons. See also Circular 375, Organic Vegetable Gardening.

Tables

Table 2. Insect Control Recommendations

Pest
 

B.t.*
 

Carbaryl
 

Malathion
 

Diazinon
 

Soap**
 

Aphids
 


 


 

X
 

X
 

X
 

Armyworm
 


 

X
 


 


 


 

Budworms
 


 

X
 


 


 


 

Cabbageworms
 

X
 

X
 

X
 

X
 


 

Col. potato beetle
 


 

X
 


 


 


 

Cucumber beetle
 


 

X
 

X
 


 


 

Earworms
 


 

X
 


 


 


 

Fleabeetle
 


 

X
 


 


 


 

Fruit, horn, pinworms
 

X
 

X
 


 


 


 

Leaf miner
 


 


 


 

X
 


 

Leafhopper
 


 

X
 

X
 

X
 


 

Leafroller
 


 

X
 

X
 

X
 


 

Melon, pickle worms
 


 

X
 


 


 


 

Mexican bean beetle
 


 

X
 

X
 

X
 


 

Pameras
 


 

X
 

X
 


 


 

Pea weevils
 


 

X
 

X
 

X
 


 

Spider mites
 


 


 

X
 

X
 

X
 

Squash vineborer
 

X
 


 


 


 


 

Stink bugs
 


 

X
 

X
 

X
 


 

Thrips
 


 

X
 

X
 

X
 

X
 

Whiteflies
 


 


 


 


 

X
 

*Bacillus thuringiensis (Biotrol, Dipel, or Thuricide).

 


 

**Soap - Use any of several commercial products. Can also use 4 tbs. liquid dish detergent/gal. water.

 


 

1. This document is SP103, one of a series of the Horticultural Sciences Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Original publication date December 1991. Revised March 1994. Reviewed May 2003. Visit the EDIS Web Site at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu.

2. J.M. Stephens, professor and Extension Vegetable Specialist, Horticultural Sciences Department; R.A. Dunn, professor and Extension Nematologist, Entomology and Nematology Department; G. Kidder, professor and Extension Soils Scientist, Soil Science Department; D. Short, professor and Extension Entomologist, Entomology and Nematology Department; G.W. Simone, associate professor and Extension Plant Pathologist, Plant Pathology Department, Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville FL 32611.

The use of trade names in this publication is solely for the purpose of providing specific information. It is not a guarantee or warranty of the products named, and does not signify that they are approved to the exclusion of others of suitable composition.

   
               
             
               
             
               
                       
 

COPYRIGHT 2010 GILSON GROUP INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.