GROWING VEGETABLES, BERRIES & FRUIT TREES IN NORTH FLORIDA

       
 

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Cool season (fall & winter) vegetables for Florida

Here's a list of the cool season (fall) vegetables commonly grown in Florida home gardens from the University of Florida IFAS Extension. Included are Suggested Varieties, Plant Family, Harvest Information, and Helpful Comments.


Suggested varieties are based on availability, performance and pest resistance. Other varieties may produce well also.

In column 2 in the chart below the plant families are named to help practice crop rotation. Avoid planting family members following each other.

Column 3 in the chart is a transplantability rating: I, easily survives transplanting; II survives with care; III, use seeds or containerized transplants only.

Column 4 is pounds of yield per 100' row.

Column 5 is days from seeding to harvest. The values in parentheses are days from transplanting to first harvest.

 

 

COOL SEASON VEGETABLES
 

Beets


 

Early Wonder, Detroit Dark Red, Cylindra, Red Ace, Little Ball


 

Chenopodiaceae
 

I
 

75
 

50-65
 

Comment: Beets require ample moisture at seeding or poor emergence results. Leaves edible


 

Broccoli


 

Early Green Sprouting, Waltham 29, Atlantic,Green Comet, Green Duke


 

Cruciferae
 

I
 

50
 

75-90

(55-70)
 

Harvest small multiple sideshoots that develop after main central head is cut.


 

Cabbage


 

Gourmet, Marion Market, King Cole, Market Prize, Red Acre, Chieftan Savoy, Rio Verde,Bravo


 

Cruciferae
 

I
 

125
 

90-110

(70-90)
 

Comment: Buy clean plants to avoid cabbage black-rot, a common bacterial disease that causes yellow patches on leaf margins. Keep an eye out for loopers, use Bt for control.


 

Carrots


 

Imperator, Thumbelina, Nantes, Gold Pak, Waltham Hicolor, Orlando Gold


 

Umbelliferae
 

II
 

100
 

65-80
 

Comment: Grow carrots on a raised bed for best results. Sow seeds shallow and thin to proper stand.


 

Cauliflower


 

Snowball Strains, Snowdrift, Imperial 10-6, Snow Crown, White Rock


 

Cruciferae
 

I
 

80
 

75-90

(55-70)
 

Comment: Tie leaves around flowerhead at 2-3 inch diameter stage to prevent discoloration. For green heads, grow broccoflower.


 

Celery


 

Utah Strains, Florida Strains, Summer Pascal


 

Umbelliferae
 

II
 

150
 

115-125

(80-105)
 

Comment: Celery requires very high soil moisture during seeding/seedling stage.


 

Chinese Cabbage


 

Michihili, Wong Bok, Bok Choy, Napa


 

Cruciferae
 

I
 

100
 

70-90

(60-70)
 

Comment: Bok Choy is open-leaf type,while Michihili and Napa form round heads.


 

Collards


 

Georgia, Vates, Blue Max, Hicrop Hybrid


 

Cruciferae
 

I
 

150
 

70-80

(40-60)
 

Comment: Tolerates more heat than most other crucifers. Harvest lower leaves. Kale may also be grown.


 

Endive/Escarole


 

Florida Deep Heart, Full Heart, Ruffec


 

Compositae
 

I
 

75
 

80-95
 

Comment: Excellent ingredient in tossed salads. Well adapted to cooler months.


 

Kohlrabi


 

Early White Vienna, Grand Duke, Purple Vienna


 

Cruciferae
 

I
 

100
 

70-80

(50-55)
 

Comment: Both red and green varieties are easily grown. Use fresh or cooked. Leaves edible.


 

Lettuce


 

Crisp: Minetto, Ithaca, Fulton, Floricrisp. Butterhead: Bibb, White Boston, Tom Thumb. Leaf: Prize Head, Red Sails, Salad Bowl. Romaine: Parris Island Cos, Valmaine, Floricos.


 

Compositae
 

I
 

75
 

50-90

(40-70)
 

Grow crisphead type in coolest part of season for firmer heads. Sow seeds very shallow, as they need light for germination. Intercrop lettuce with long-season vegetables.


 

Mustard


 

Southern Giant Curled, Florida Broad Leaf, Tendergreen


 

Cruciferae
 

II
 

100
 

40-60
 

Consider planting in a wide-row system. Broadleaf type requires more space. Cooked as "greens".


 

Onions


 

Bulbing: Excel, Texas Grano, Granex, White Granex, Tropicana Red

Bunching: White Portugal, Evergreen, Beltsville Bunching, Perfecto Blanco

Multipliers: Shallots


 

Amaryllidaceae
 

III
 

100100100
 

120-160

(110-120)

50-75

(30-40)

(30-40)
 

Comment: Plant short-day bulbing varieties. For bunching onions, insert sets upright for straight stems. For multipliers, divide and reset. Bulbing onions may be seeded in the fall, then transplanted in early spring (Jan-Feb). `Granex' used for Vidalia and St. Augustine Sweets.


 

Parsley


 

Moss Curled, Perfection, Italian


 

Umbelliferae
 

II
 

40
 

70-90
 

Comment: Grow parsley root similarly (Hamburg type). Curly and plain types do well.


 

Peas, English


 

Wando, Green Arrow, Laxton's Progress, Sugar Snap, Oregon Sugar.


 

Leguminoseae
 

III
 

40
 

50-70
 

Comment: Edible podded type are "Oregon" (flat) and "Sugar Snap" (round) - be sure to trellis.


 

Potatoes


 

Sebago, Red Pontiac, Atlantic, Red LaSoda, LaRouge, Superior


 

Solanaceae
 

II
 

150
 

85-110
 

Comment: Plant 2-ounce seed pieces with eyes. Do not use table-stock for seed. Remove tops two weeks before digging to "toughen skin." Varieties planted by seeds produce less than from tubers.


 

Radish


 

Cherry Belle, Comet, Early Scarlet Globe, White Icicle, Sparkler, Red Prince, Champion, Snowbelle


 

Cruciferae
 

III
 

40
 

20-30
 

Comment: The winter type (Daikon) grows well in Florida, too. Inter-crop summer type with slow growing vegetables to save space.


 

Spinach


 

Virginia Savoy, Melody, Bloomsdale Longstanding, Tyee, Olympia


 

Chenopodiaceae
 

II
 

40
 

45-60
 

Comment: Grow during coolest months. Malabar spinach is a more prolific type that grows well in Florida.
 
Strawberry


 

Florida 90, Chandler, Dover, Florida Belle, Oso Grande, Sweet Charlie, Selva


 

Rosaceae
 

I
 

50
 

(90-110)
 

Comment: Plant short-day varieties. Grow as an annual crop starting with disease-free plants in the fall.


 

Turnips


 

Roots/Tops: Purple-Top White Globe, Just RiteTops: All Top


 

Cruciferae
 

III
 

150
 

40-60
 

Comment: Grow for roots and tops. Broadcast seed in wide-row system or single file.

 

 

   
               
             
               
             
               
             
               
             
               
             
               
             
               
             
               
             
               
             
                       
 

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